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Hemp or Bamboo Inserts For Cloth Diapers

Parents want to know is there any difference between hemp or bamboo inserts for cloth diapers? You choose bamboo for softness while hemp for high absorbency and environment. Bamboo can last up to 4 to 5 hours. On the other hand, hemp can last up to 6 hours.

In this article, we will discuss the differences between hemp and bamboo inserts for cloth diapers. 

Is There Any Difference Between Hemp and Bamboo Inserts for Cloth Diapers?

Yes, there are lots of differences between hemp and bamboo inserts. The main difference between the two is the absorbency. On average, bamboo can last up to 4 to 5 hours. On the other hand, hemp can last up to 6 hours. They also differ in materials. Materials used in these inserts affect the absorbency. 

Materials also affect how fast and how much it absorbs liquid. When we talk about microfibers, they are the fastest, but they hold the least. That’s why a combination of inserts is used. Hemp is the most absorbent, while microfibers are the fastest absorbers. You can use the combination of inserts for heavy wetters, but ideally for only nighttime use. 

What are the Different Types of Inserts?

There are three main types of inserts, such as hemp, bamboo, and microfiber. In this article, we will discuss hemp, bamboo, and microfiber inserts for cloth diapers.

  • Hemp 
  • Hemp is a natural fiber, and it is used in inserts and offers excellent absorbency. More importantly, it is naturally antimicrobial. Hemp inserts tend to hold 2.5 times more liquid than microfiber. Hemp inserts become more absorbent and softer after washing and use them in combination with microfiber inserts to get the best nighttime solution. These inserts contain blends of cotton and hemp. That’s why hemp inserts are incredibly durable. 

    How to Use Hemp Inserts?

    Hemp inserts are slow and stable absorber. Hemp inserts work better when they are used under cotton or microfiber inserts. It depends on the brands, some brands have high-quality hemp inserts, and you can use them alone. 

    Pros of Hemp Inserts

    • Most absorbent probably 2.5 times more absorbent than others.
    • The most sustainable option. 
    • Naturally, trim

    Cons of Hemp Inserts

    • Feel stiffer
    • Slow to dry
    • More expensive

    So these are the pros and cons of hemp inserts. 

  • Bamboo
  • Bamboo is a highly absorbent natural fiber. Bamboo inserts remain soft even wash after wash. Rayon is the actual material that is used in cloth diapers. Bamboo inserts are super absorbent, but still don’t retain the antimicrobial feature of bamboo. Mostly you will see the mix of bamboo and polyester. You can check different brands to find the best and affordable bamboo. Rates and quality will be different for various brands. 

    How to Use Bamboo?

    The specialty of bamboo inserts is that they can be placed anywhere. While using them, there is no danger of harming the skin of babies and getting leaks. 

    Pros of Bamboo Inserts

    • Trim and absorbent
    • Soft
    • Absorb liquid quickly

    Cons of Bamboo Inserts

  • The manufacturing process of bamboo inserts is environmentally unfriendly.
  • Expensive than other inserts. 
  • You can decide whether to use bamboo inserts or not after looking at their pros and cons. 

    How to Prepare Hemp and Bamboo Inserts for Use?

    Both hemp and bamboo inserts are made from natural fibers, so both these inserts contain natural oils. So, it is recommended to wash them separately for at least three times to remove oils. It is better to wash them with hot water and a small amount of detergent separately. Otherwise, they will deposit oil on other cloth diapers. 

    You can do it only once with your other laundry and use them. Hemp inserts require eight hot washes with drying to reach its maximum absorbency. You can make frequent changes or add additional absorbency until the inserts are fully prepared. 

  • Microfiber
  • These inserts are made from synthetic material. They are super fast when it comes to absorbency. Microfiber inserts are mostly used in overnight and pocket diapers. More importantly, these are the most inexpensive inserts. You don’t have to take tension of drying them because they get dried quickly on a clothesline or in the dryer. When you touch these inserts, you can feel the difference in material. 

    The disadvantage of these inserts is that they have a short lifespan compared to other inserts made from hemp and bamboo. Most people report that after a year, it will start losing absorbing power. They start to have leaks around the legs. You need to replace them when these signs begin to show up. Microfiber inserts can hold ammonia more than the natural fiber inserts. Moreover, these are not the trimmest inserts. 

    How to Prepare Microfiber Inserts for Use?

    Microfiber inserts don’t require pre-wash or care. You can use them because they don’t contain natural oils. Moreover, they arrive at the full absorbency. If you want to remove manufacturing issues, you can wash them once. It depends on you, but it’s not necessary. 

    How to Use Microfiber Inserts?

    Never place microfiber inserts directly against the baby’s skin. These inserts are moisture absorbent, and when they contact with the baby’s skin, they absorb moisture and cause redness and rash. You might get a feeling of dryness when you touch their skin. So, keep these factors in mind. As long as you are maintaining a protective layer in the shape of fabric between skin and inserts, your baby is safe. 

    Pros of Microfiber Inserts

  • Most economical inserts, available in the market.
  • Absorb wetness quickly
  • Dry quickly
  • Cons of Microfiber Inserts

    • Lifespan is short
    • Hold ammonia and diaper stink
    • It can’t be placed next to the baby’s skin. 

    Conclusion

    People want to know which one is better from hemp or bamboo inserts for cloth diapers. A complete article is in front of you and you can check by looking at the pros and cons of each material and decide which one is best for your baby. When we compare bamboo and hemp, hemp offers more absorbency. Both of these inserts are expensive. 


    Efforts have been made to get the information as accurate and updated as possible. If you found any incorrect information with credible source, please send it via the contact us form
    Author

    Sky Hoon
    Family Man. He is a family man and married with 1 child. Spent countless nights changing diaper and surprised how outdated diapers are. Nevertheless, there is no solution yet as a parent, just want to research more about diapers.
    Read His Personal Blog


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